photography

Every frame a painting

This is absolutely fascinating--and makes me want to rewatch all of SPN while taking notes.
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  • Baking bread

    I am lazy and so didn't complete the fic I was working on today. So here's a video of someone actually completing something a lot more…

  • Almost finished...

    While I sleep on the ending of wetsammy's fic, here's the lastest fabulous offering from Shaving People, Punting Things:

  • A not-so-past way of life

    While I wait for my brain to agree to start writing again, here are three glimpses into another place and nearly another time. It's so easy to…

Yay! I'm so glad you like Every Frame a Painting. My personal favorite is the little celebration of Roger Deakins in "Shot/Reverse Shot."

Edit: I actually just rewatched this one (they're so good!), and I was thinking particularly of the point made about how lingering in a shot and building it appropriately can force the audience to really believe an emotional beat. Pacing is the #1 reason a lot of movies/shows feel badly done to me. SPN does a pretty good job of it, I think. It usually doesn't fall into the usual pitfalls of a genre show on a cable network: cutting too quickly to move along with the plot, to the detriment of the characters. Maybe that's because the show is *actually* about Sam and Dean?

Edited at 2016-07-19 05:58 pm (UTC)
My college roommate and I sat down and watched almost the entire series in one go, partway through our rewatch of the Cornello trilogy. It was pretty epic.

I think. It usually doesn't fall into the usual pitfalls of a genre show on a cable network: cutting too quickly to move along with the plot, to the detriment of the characters. Maybe that's because the show is *actually* about Sam and Dean?

So the plot is propelled by them, rather than vice versa? There's probably a bit of truth there. Also helps, I'm sure, that one of the executive producers started in the business as an editor--I'm guessing that angle of the production gets a fair bit of attention. Another factor might be that the initial concept was "a new horror movie every week", which would encourage a more cinematographic style.

Watching some of the director-focused EFaP episodes, I was struck by just how insane television production is--you have these movie directors that will take days and days to get a single scene just right, and then you have these TV nutjobs that bang out the equivalent of nearly half a movie every single week. Looked at from that perspective, a show of SPN's consistently high quality is nigh miraculous.