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Drabble: Iron Mongery

Hum. I'm not sure what I think of this. Here's a response to A Good Man, from the perspective of the boy-who-isn't-really-a-boy-anymore. I have the suspicion that like most sequels, it's not as good as the original. Well, at least I can say that I didn't really want to write it - I just couldn't get it out of my head.

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Iron Mongery


Iron must be struck when hot: such is the way of things. He is iron, and the stranger has waited too long to strike.

As a boy, he might have been shaped into a king, but as a man, he will not change himself even for a kingdom. A throne for the winning, but he won’t play. He belongs in the forge, not a palace. Others can overthrow a tyrant, but he is the village’s only blacksmith.

Iron must be struck when hot: such is the way of things. He is iron, and the stranger waited too long to strike.

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Yes, I know it's short.
That's cool. It's almost incongruous with the way I originally read A Good Man, which was that it was a strange variety of righteousness, not inflexibility, that makes him remain a blacksmith. But both ways are interesting and interact well.

I repeat. Expand and clarify A Good Man. Explore this theme. Hurrah!
Well, he is righteous, but he's also determined not to simply become what another desires him to be. The main point I wanted to make is that he's grown into himself already, and so less likely to simply throw away who he is and what he has. So it's not that the would-be mentor dude is wrong, he simply doesn't have a complete grasp of the situation.